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Welcoming a May Crane Fellow for Learning Space Design

A multilingual and bi-cultural polymath, artist, urbanist, and architect/landscape-architect-in-training, Alberto Embriz de Salvatierra brings significant expertise in learning space design to the Harvard Library.

 

Please join us in welcoming Alberto Embriz de Salvatierra, our inaugural May Crane Fellow for Learning Space Design. Funded by Zachary D. Levenick, AB 2000, the May Crane Fellowship at Harvard Library encourages undergraduate engagement and advances the careers of graduate students.

Supervised by Sue Gilroy and Hugh Truslow, Alberto will conduct independent exploration on how learning spaces support Harvard undergraduate student experiences. He will meet with staff and students, analyze historical documents, and present his findings in May.

We look forward to collaborating with Alberto this spring. Please contact Sue or Hugh if you would like to meet with Alberto, or if you have any questions about this May Crane Fellowship.

Meet Alberto

A multilingual and bi-cultural polymath, artist, urbanist, and architect/landscape-architect-in-training, Alberto Embriz de Salvatierra brings significant expertise in learning space design to the Harvard Library.

Alberto received his Bachelor of Architecture from Cornell University and is currently a dual-degree candidate for a Master of Landscape Architecture and an advanced post-professional Master of Design Studies in Urbanism, Landscape and Ecology at Harvard University's Graduate School of Design.

He has conducted academic-related travel and research in 23 countries over the last 6 years and his work has been featured in various publications including Cornell’s Association and GSD’s Platform.

He has previously been an Adjunct Faculty for the Boston Architectural College's Summer Academy and a Research Assistant for the Waste-to-Energy Design Lab at the GSD. Alberto is currently the Founding Chairman of the Center for Civilization, a Representative at Harvard's Presidential Task Force on Inclusion and Belonging and an Academic Writing Tutor at Loeb Library.

Describing his fellowship goals, Alberto writes,

“Even a brief overview of the development of civilization will reveal the library as a crucial organ for the preservation and diffusion of knowledge. Buttressed with a vastly complex historical genealogy that spans back millennia, libraries today—some might argue—are facing an unprecedented identity crisis.

Digital technologies have catalyzed a set of rapidly evolving paradigms that have redefined society’s relationship with the curation and dissemination of information. Therefore, if the library is to remain relevant in the age of modernity, discourse on these knowledge spaces must be playfully speculative and rigorously projective.

The fellowship’s opening agenda will be focused on understanding the collective undergraduate experience at the libraries of Harvard University. A networked structure invariably attuned to Cambridge’s urban fabric, the Harvard libraries’ interrelationships will be examined while decoding key nodes within the system. As an exercise in scale, Lamont Library will also become a useful case study and microcosm for the whole.

Ultimately, this project aims to comprehend existing conditions and propose new contemporary archetypes that will lead to greater engagement from—and diversity and inclusion of—Harvard undergraduates.”

By Sue Gilroy, Librarian for Undergraduate Programs for Writing, Hugh Truslow, Head, Social Sciences and Visualization, and Anu Vedantham, Director of Learning and Teaching Services, FAS Libraries.

Published on April 5, 2017.

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