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Preservation Week Recap
 

To celebrate Preservation Week 2017, Harvard Library Preservation Services staff hit the road and shared what they know with the Harvard community. They offered on-site demonstrations and workshops to engage students, faculty, and staff with the behind-the-scenes work done to make collections accessible and usable for research and teaching. And this year they partnered with RTL-Shares to provide a hands-on event about preservation basics for mini-exhibitions. The organizing team included Kate Rich, Karen Walter, Drew O’Doherty, Lisa Clark, Laura Panadero, Isabelle Chavanne, and Priscilla Anderson.

The slides below include descriptions of, and some takeaways from, the various demonstrations offered during the week.

Slideshow

Optical Media Identification and Preservation presentation

Elizabeth Walters and Isabelle Chavanne, “Optical Media Identification and Preservation.” All optical media are not equally vulnerable. Optical media that are most likely to contain important and irreplaceable content are the most fragile of all.

protective enclosures for library materials

Amanda Wininger, "Thinking Inside the Box: Protective Enclosures for Library Materials." There are lots of things that you can do for damaged books beyond repair. Custom-sized boxes keep parts together and protect books from light, dust, and warping.  

 

Erin Murphy and Laura Panadero showcase different careers in preservation.

Erin Murphy and Laura Panadero showcase different careers in preservation. 

Vanessa Venti, “Preserving Your Digital Images” with Tricia Patterson.

Vanessa Venti, “Preserving Your Digital Images” with Tricia Patterson. Three key takeaways for managing your endless trove of digital photos: have three copies, use a reliable photo management program like Lightroom, and shoot in Raw format.

 

Susi Barbarossa and Christopher Sokolowski, “Sealed Packages” and "Bad Framing / Good Framing.”

Susi Barbarossa and Christopher Sokolowski, “Sealed Packages” and "Bad Framing / Good Framing.” Protecting your matted items is easier than you think it might be. Preservation-quality materials are the foundation of a frame that will preserve artwork for many years.

 

Candace Kang and Catherine Badot-Costello, “Paper Examination.

Candace Kang and Catherine Badot-Costello, “Paper Examination.” Historic papers have many fascinating and different qualities if you take the time to look at and feel them.  

 

Katherine Beaty, “Leather Tooling."

Katherine Beaty, “Leather Tooling." There’s no magic to gold-tooling, but there’s plenty of skill required to impress decorative tools and letters into leather. Blind tooling without the gold is a bit easier, but success requires a precise blend of temperature, time, and pressure to produce consistent letters.  

 

Anne McLain, “Make Your Own Pamphlet."

Anne McLain, “Make Your Own Pamphlet." Dudley House visitors learned to sew pamphlet-style books with traditional bookbinding tools and beautiful decorated papers.

 

Cabot Library preservation demonstration

Cabot Library demonstrations included analytical imaging, analysis of salted paper prints, environmental monitoring, and digital archiving.

Priscilla Anderson and Isabelle Chavanne, “Of Mice and PEMs: Managing the Indoor Environment in Libraries.”

Priscilla Anderson and Isabelle Chavanne, “Of Mice and PEMs: Managing the Indoor Environment in Libraries.” Preservation uses chemistry, physics, biology, and engineering to manage the proper temperature, humidity, and air quality needed to preserve Harvard’s diverse collections.

 

Imaging techniques reveal hard-to-see topographical information.

Adam Kellie and Kathryn Kenney, “Reflectance Transformation Imaging and Dynamic Relighting.” Imaging techniques reveal hard-to-see topographical information.

 

Elena Bulat and Laura Panadero, “Examination of Salted Paper Prints.”

Elena Bulat and Laura Panadero, “Examination of Salted Paper Prints.” We have uncovered a treasure trove of early salted paper photographic prints in Harvard’s collections and refined techniques to identify them.  We also teamed up with Harvard’s Center for Nanoscale Systems to analyze coatings on these historic images.

 

Carie McGinnis, "Preservation Basics for Mini-Exhibitions: Condition Assessment."

Carie McGinnis, "Preservation Basics for Mini-Exhibitions: Condition Assessment." Work with conservation staff to assess the condition of your exhibition items early and often.

 

Laura Panadero, “Preservation Basics for Mini-Exhibitions: Light Damage.”

Laura Panadero, “Preservation Basics for Mini-Exhibitions: Light Damage.” Too much light exposure during exhibition can permanently change color of papers, photographs, inks, and fabrics. Preservation staff can help measure and mitigate the risk.

Catherine Badot-Costello, “Preservation Basics for Mini-Exhibitions: Supports.”

Catherine Badot-Costello, “Preservation Basics for Mini-Exhibitions: Supports.” Customized supports can prevent damage and enhance the aesthetics of an exhibition.

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