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News and Events

The Library shares news on its world-class collections, talented staff and informative events.
 
Find more events by visiting the Harvard Library calendar.

 
 

The Early Audubon

A singular collection of naturalist drawings captures the evolution of his science and art.

 
 

News

 

InsideOUT

A new exhibition at Houghton Library showcases artistic and innovative approaches to the traditional craft of bookbinding.

 

Of Books, Trees and Knowledge

The Arnold Arboretum library has them all, making it a unique draw for scholars worldwide.

 

Lost Voices of 1953

The thoughts and theories of writer Ralph Ellison come to life with the rediscovery of Harvard conference recordings.

 

Widener Library at 100

Harvard President Drew Faust on Widener over a century.

 

Search Books & Articles Together!

graphic books plus articles together equals love

HOLLIS+, a new discovery system with intuitive interface, search precision enhances access to multiple types of materials from one starting point.

 

10 Thoughts on Digital Libraries: Where They Are Going

students working on computers

Vice President Sarah Thomas speaks to the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP) on digital libraries.

 

Treating Ebola

Scott Podolsky

Dr. Scott Podolosky of Countway Library of Medicine on Ebola treatment over the years.

 

Scholarly Access to All

Never heard of Svalbard and Jan Mayen? Join the club. These Norse islands in the remote Arctic Ocean are among the few places in the world with no recorded downloads from Digital Access to Scholarship at Harvard (DASH), the free and open repository for peer-reviewed literature written by Harvard faculty. With more than 20,000 items in storage, DASH is growing quickly. Since it started in 2009, the articles and dissertations in its repository have been downloaded more than 3.4 million times.

 

Tracking Fritz Lang

For many, the name Fritz Lang is synonymous with the image of a futuristic female robot, the haunting poster child for his 1927 science fiction classic Metropolis. But the Austrian-born director was a master of many genres, as visitors to the Harvard Film Archive (HFA) will see for themselves in the coming months. Beginning Friday and running through Sept. 1, the HFA will present a complete retrospective of Lang’s silent and talking feature films. With almost 40 works in total, the series is a tribute to the director’s remarkable range. 

 

Early Experiments in Catching the Eye

No blame will be assigned if you have never heard of the Massasoit Varnish Works or B.T. Babbitt’s Best Soap. And rest easy if you have forgotten that during the late 19th century, for the modest sum of 50 cents, you could purchase from the New York Dental Co. of 7 Tremont St. in Boston a device for the painless extraction of teeth. And yet blame and shame are all yours if you don’t see “The Art of American Advertising,” an exhibit open through Aug. 1 at Baker Library. The idea: illustrate the rise in America of artful, profit-making, culture-shaking advertising from 1865 to 1910.

 

Got Copyright?

The Harvard Library launches the Copyright First Responders Program, a resource for anyone at Harvard with copyright questions.

 

Susan Ware Appointed Senior Advisor to the Schlesinger Library

Historian Susan Ware AM ’73, PhD ’78 will become a senior advisor to the library and will serve during the academic year while the Radcliffe Institute conducts a search for a new director of the library.

 

Scrolls and Scrolling

scroll

Scholars who work with historical objects may think of those objects as worlds apart from emerging technology, but students in two courses — one offered through the Committee on Medieval Studies and Harvard Divinity School, the other through the Program in General Education — harnessed the power of both to curate exhibits now on display.

 

Genesis of Genius

Nine tiny, hand-lettered, hand-bound books made by Charlotte and Branwell Brontë were preserved and digitized to be made available to a global audience.

 

Harvard Library to Help Preserve Tibetan Literary Heritage

Beginning in July, Harvard Library will upload onto its digital storage system 10 million pages of Tibetan literature that survived China’s convulsive Cultural Revolution, the movement between 1966 and 1976 that led to the destruction of countless Chinese and Tibetan literary texts. The project is the result of a partnership between Harvard Library and the Tibetan Buddhist Resource Center (TBRC), a nonprofit organization based in Harvard Square that has been acquiring, scanning, and digitally preserving Tibetan volumes since its founding in 1999.

 

Astrobites: AAS Digital Switch

The American Astronomical Society announced earlier this week that it will no longer print physical (paper) editions of its publications. This represents a major and monumental change for one of the field’s most venerable institutions and its widely read and cited journals. Chris Erdmann of the Wolbach Library discusses what this shift signals for practitioners in the field of astronomy and academic publishing generally.

 

Florence Fearrington Librarian Appointed

Thomas Hyry from the University of California, Los Angeles will join Houghton Library in fall 2014.

 

Life Pieces to Masterpieces Exhibit

The Gutman Library’s first-floor gallery space was home to a collection of collaboratively created works by underprivileged African American youths. The “Life Pieces to Masterpieces” exhibit, comprising 29 pieces, touched on subject matters ranging from Cirque du Soleil to absent fathers to Mitt Romney.

 

Harvard-Yenching Library Becomes Permanent Member of China Academic Digital Associative Library (CADAL)

CADAL will provide free access to 1.75 million Chinese e-books to Harvard University.

 

Future-Proofing the Research Library

Sarah Thomas, vice president of the Harvard Library, delivered the inaugural Judith Nadler Vision Lecture at the University of Chicago’s Joseph Regenstein Library on May 22. Thomas’s talk, “Future-Proofing the Research Library,” examined the many ways that academic libraries are adapting to the changes in their campus roles.

 

Degrees of History

Glimpses through the ages in the earliest Harvard diplomas.

 

Chefs and Suffragettes

Beautiful photographs from the Schlesinger Library collection available to purchase online.

 

Grandes Dames of the Gardens

A New York Times article features materials from Harvard’s Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America.

 

Fliss Appointed Head of Gutman Library

Dean James Ryan of GSE names Susan Fliss librarian and director.

 

Illuminating the Dark Ages

Professor Hamburger with medieval text

A recently-awarded NEH planning grant will help display and digitize Boston-area medieval manuscripts.

 

Inaugural Pforzheimer Fellows Selected

pforzheimer fellows announcement

Four fellows to join Harvard libraries this summer.

 

It's Bike to Work Week!

Library staff member Tom Lingner provides tips on biking to work.

 

Thomas Elected to AAAS

Vice President Sarah Thomas will join the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, one of the most prestigious honorary societies in the US.

 

A World Digital Library Is Coming True!

In the May 22 issue of The New York Review of Books, Carl H. Pforzheimer University Professor and University Librarian Robert Darnton discusses the future of the digital library.

 

Spring Planting

This year’s Countway Community Garden crop will include plants veggies, flowers and medicinal herbs.

 

Library's Digital Archive Commemorates Emergency Medical Response

An article about the Strong Medicine exhibit in the Harvard Crimson

 

Tiny Treasure

Small—just 17 by 12.8 centimeters—Armenian Gospels feature stunning color drawings and meticulous work.

 

Elsevier Takedowns Q&A

Peter Suber from the Office for Scholarly Communication on the takedown notices Harvard received from Elsevier.

 

Boston Marathon Medical Mementos

Boston Magazine covers Strong Medicine, a joint project of Harvard's Countway Library and the Boston Medical Library. 

 

'Strong Medicine' Honors Medical Community

WBZ-TV covers Strong Medicine, a library project that captures the stories of medical professionals who responded to the Boston Marathon bombings.

 

Harry's Books

Take a virtual tour of the Harry Elkins Widener Memorial Collection.

 

Strong Medicine

A new archive captures the stories of medical professionals who saved countless lives following the Boston Marathon bombing.

 

Story Debunked

New testing shows a book thought to be bound in human skin is actually bound in sheepskin.

 

A New Chapter in Verse

The Woodberry Poetry Room kicked off a new series called "Reinventing the Workshop" to examine the process and tradition of instruction in creative writing.

 

Science or Art?

Wired magazine features beautiful images from the Biodiversity Heritage Library, to which the Harvard Botany Libraries and Ernst Mayr Library are key contributors.

 

Ties to the Past

A collection of Walter Gropius’s bowties at the Loeb Design Library reflects his love of joy.

 

50 for 50

The Gutman Gallery showcases 50 photographs to mark the 50th anniversary of the Cambridge Historical Commission, exploring “what makes Cambridge, Cambridge.” (Photo: Bill Shaw)

 

Small But Mighty

Tiny, fragile, beautifully detailed model stage sets for 19th-20th-century theater productions from the Harvard Theatre Collection.

 

Bach to Bach

Joint exhibitions at Houghton Library and Loeb Music Library mark the 300th anniversary of composer C.P.E. Bach’s birth.

 

Harvard, Cornell, Stanford Libraries Project Receives Grant

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation awarded a nearly $1 million, two-year grant to support an investigation using Linked Data and the Semantic Web to improve discovery and access of scholarly information by the three libraries.

 

America’s First Book

An extremely rare copy of the Bay Psalm Book (1640), the first book printed in America, will be on display for a limited time. Harvard holds one of only 11 remaining copies.

 

The Colonial North America Project

An ambitious Library project digitizes and posts online tens of thousands of documents from archival collections at Harvard and beyond.

 

The Digital Dickinson

A sophisticated site gathers her poems, in her handwriting, for all to see and study.

 

New Library VP Sees Opportunities Ahead

Sarah Thomas

In a move that brings together the leadership of the libraries of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) and the Harvard Library under a single individual, Sarah Thomas, vice president for the Harvard Library, has been named to carry forward plans for increased cooperation and communication as the Roy E. Larsen Librarian of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. 

 

Undergraduate Book Collecting Award Winners Recognized

Visiting Committee Prize for Undergraduate Book Collecting

This year's winners of the Visiting Committee Prize for Undergraduate Book Collecting were recognized at a reception in Widener Library. The Prize is awarded annually to recognize and encourage book collecting by Harvard undergraduates.

 

Library Acquires Original Star Trek Writers' Guide

Star Trek writers' guide

The original, photocopied handbook from 1967, part of Houghton Library's large science fiction collection, includes intriguing details on the original TV show's ethos, characters, terminology and spaceship.
 

 

Spring Exams 2013: Library Hours & Services

Spring Exams 2013: Library Hours & Services

Cramming at 2am? Lamont is open 24/7. Prefer a fireplace? Go to Gutman. Study break? Borrow a bike from the Law School Library. Freaking out? Check out Cooper, a therapy dog, from Countway.
 

 

Hofer Prize Winners Announced

The annual prize, named for Philip Hofer ’21, a former curator of Houghton Library, is given to students whose collection of books or works of art fulfill “the traditions of breadth, coherence and imagination” exemplified by Hofer.

 

Gutman Library Renovation Certified LEED Platinum

The Harvard Graduate School of Education’s 2012 renovation of Gutman Library’s first and second floor was recently recognized by the United States Green Building Council (USGBC), receiving LEED Platinum certification.

 

Mirror With a Memory

 
The Harvard University Archives' exhibit displays photographs and other artifacts spotlighting Harvard in the Civil War era.

 

HLS and the Road to Marriage Equality

The Caspersen Room in the Harvard Law School Library is currently displaying an exhibit documenting the involvement of HLS students, faculty and alumni in the long road to marriage equality.

 

Alpha, Beta, Zeega

Alpha, Beta, Zeega

Zeega is a Harvard Library Lab project that revolutionizes interactive storytelling by allowing users to harness text, images and audio from the Web. 

 

Portraits of a Vanished Indian Life

Portraits of a Vanished Indian Life

Two photo albums at Harvard's Tozzer Library contain more than one thousand rare images of 19th century Native Americans.

 

A Tuned-In Savior

A Tuned-In Savior

Harvard graduate student Rachel Vandagriff "discovered" a treasure trove of materials related to new music champion Paul Fromm and created an exhibit at Loeb Music Library.

 

Biodiversity Heritage Library Receives Computerworld Laureate Award

Biodiversity Heritage Library Receives Computerworld Laureate Award

The Biodiversity Heritage Library, co-founded by Harvard's Botany Library and Ernst Mayr Library, was named a 2013 Laureate by the Computerworld Honors Program.

 

Hidden Treasures

Hidden Treasures

More than 400 glass models of marine creatures in the Library collection are so delicate that they rarely, if ever, go on public display.

 

Harvard Library Quirky Collections

Harvard Library Quirky Collections

Bathing trunks, breathable chocolate, musket balls: read about odd acquisitions in the Harvard Library collection.

 

Poetic Greetings

Poetic Greetings

From 1976-96, Harvard Square pedestrians entered the Phone-a-Poem installation, dialed, and heard poems read by Allen Ginsberg, Anne Waldman and others recorded on an answering machine.

 

Arresting Images

Arresting Images

A Harvard Law School Library Exhibit demonstrates America's appetite for tawdry and salacious crime, long before O.J. or Oscar.

 

Library's New Page Delivery Service Optimizes Tablet Display

Library's New Page Delivery Service Optimizes Tablet Display

Read about the Harvard Library's tablet version of the Page Delivery Service, designed to provide significant benefits to Harvard's researchers.

 

Valentine's Day in the Harvard Library Collection

Valentine's Day in the Harvard Library Collection

"Be mine, you nasty and ugly and crabbed old scold," states a rare 19th century hand-drawn valentine--explore (and enjoy!) Valentine’s Day through the Harvard Library collection.

 

The Emancipation Proclamation Now

The Emancipation Proclamation Now

On the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation, read about its ongoing impact and the rare miniature version, printed for freed slaves, in the Houghton Library collection.

 

A Remembrance of Things Proust

A Remembrance of Things Proust

Read about a semester-long exhibit at Houghton Library, "Private Proust: Letters and Drawings to Reynaldo Hahn," on the 100th anniversary of the publication of Proust's Swann's Way.

 

Harvard Film Archive Films Now Searchable Through Library Catalog

Harvard Film Archive Films Now Searchable Through Library Catalog

The majority of the Harvard Film Archive's records--representing more than 23,000 films and videotapes--are now searchable through the Harvard Library catalog, HOLLIS.

 

Harvard-Yenching Library Joins Borrow Direct

Harvard-Yenching Library Joins Borrow Direct

More than 400,000 items from the Harvard-Yenching Library collection are now accessible to Harvard's Borrow Direct partners, in addition to the approximately 6.5 million items from Harvard's collections previously made available to Borrow Direct partners.

 

Note Taking in a Clickable Age

Note Taking in a Clickable Age

Read about the Take Note Symposium, which included tours to see items in several Harvard libraries.

 

Girls Who Rock Out

Girls Who Rock Out

"She likes death metal and bunnies at the same time." Read about Girls Rock!, a documentary that follows girls attending the Girls Rock Camp, screened at a Schlesinger Library Movie Night.

 

Library Lab Puts on a Show

Library Lab Puts on a Show

Read about the Harvard Library Lab's Showcase, a campus-wide exhibition of 28 Library Lab projects that make original contributions to the way libraries work. 

 

Battle Cries of Freedom

Battle Cries of Freedom

Read an article about a Countway Library Center for the History of Medicine exhibit that explores how the Civil War challenged paradigms of death, medicine and mourning.

 

Libraries Re-Imagined: Harvard Opens a Pop-Up Labrary in Cambridge

Harvard Opens a Pop-Up Labrary in Cambridge

BostonInno stops by the Labrary, a pop-up storefront space that explores how innovations in design can help libraries evolve. 

 

The Publishing Industry Isn't Doomed

The Publishing Industry Isn't Doomed

Fast Company quotes University Librarian Robert Darnton on the democratization of publishing.

 

A Place to Put All Those Curiosities

A Place to Put All Those Curiosities

The New York Times reviews an exhibit at New York's Grolier Club which features several items from the Houghton Library collection.

 

Cookbooks Echo with the Wisdom of Chefs Past

Cookbooks Echo with the Wisdom of Chefs Past

The New York Times writes about marginalia in cookbooks, inlcuding those of Julia Child in the Schlesinger Library collection.

 

Multimedia Immersion

Multimedia Immersion

Read about a Harvard Wintersession boot camp for faculty, students and librarians focused on using new media in research, teaching and learning.

 

The Rise, Ruin of a China Trader

The Rise, Ruin of a China Trader

Read about a Baker Library online exhibit on the earliest days of the China trade and the successes and ultimate failure of a New England trader.

 

Santo Domingo Collection Chronicles Cultural Backdrop of Sex, Drugs

Santo Domingo Collection Chronicles Cultural Backdrop of Sex, Drugs

The Santo Domingo Collection at Harvard features art, literature and popular culture artifacts related to achieving altered states of mind.

 

Chronicle: Harvard Library Innovation Lab

Harvard Library Innovation Lab

Harvard’s Library Innovation Lab projects featured in the Chronicle of Higher Education.

 

Harvard to Contribute Special Collections Materials to Digital Public Library of America

The Harvard Library plans to share several collections with the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA)—becoming the first DPLA content hub.

 

The Art of Saving Art

The Art of Saving Art

Weissman conservators repair Le Corbusier and Miró works for the Carpenter Center.

 

Evidence of Greatness

Evidence of Greatness

Harvard Law School showcases the life and work of Joseph Story in an exhibit and digital suite.

 

Harvard Library to Adopt RDA

The Harvard Library

The Harvard Library plans to adopt Resource Description and Access (RDA), joining the three US national libraries—Library of Congress, the National Library of Medicine and the National Agricultural Library and peers—in implementing the new code.

 

Edward Lear's Natural History

Edward Lear

"The Natural History of Edward Lear," on display at Houghton Library, shows the famed nonsense writer’s early devotion to painting, and sketching.

 

Old Japan, Online

“Early Photography of Japan,” a virtual collection of more than 2,000 images from three Harvard University libraries, documents the early history of Japanese commercial photography, and reflects the Western image of traditional Japanese culture before the modernization that occurred during the Meiji period (1868–1912).

 

Guides to the Gallows

The Law School's "Dying Speeches and Bloody Murders" collection captures 19th century English trials and executions.

 

Widener’s Slavic Division Boasts Rich Collection from across the Region

Harvard receives gift of Macedonia Literature

Macedonian President Ivanov recently presented a gift of 130 books of Macedonia literature to the Slavic Collection during recent visit to Harvard.

 

Sensibly Saving Jane Austen

Two of her fragile letters, owned by Harvard, undergo painstaking repair at the Library's Weissman Preservation Center.

 

Provost Alan Garber on Harvard Library Launch

"I am confident that the remarkable strengths of our libraries, and particularly the people who bring them to life, will allow us to build a Harvard Library that will set the standard now and in the future."

 

Updike's Roots and Evolution

"John Updike: A Glimpse from the Archive" at Houghton Library explores how Updike, a boy from rural Pennsylvania, became Updike the international literary icon.

 

Boston Globe: Julia Child Turns 100 at Radcliffe

The Boston Globe features the Julia Child Collection at the Schlesinger Library on Child's centenary celebration.

 

A Julia-Worthy Feast

Materials from the Julia Child Collection at the Schlesinger Library highlight Julia's work, marriage and joie de vivre.

 

Harvard's Best Listeners

The Library's audio team makes high-end digital copies of audio artifacts, some in fragile or rare formats.

 

The New York Times: Harvard Releases Big Data for Books

The New York Times covers the Harvard Library's release of nearly 100% of its records—more than 12 million from 73 libraries.

 

US News and World Report: Is the Academic Publishing Industry on the Verge of Disruption?

US News & World Report explores academic journals and the Library Faculty Advisory Council's warning on their cost.

 
 

Events

 

Theodore Roosevelt: “How I Love Sagamore Hill”

Sep
1

Houghton Library opens the New Year with selections from a photographic series by Xiomáro, a New York artist commissioned by the National Park service to photograph the interiors of Theodore Roosevelt's “Summer Whitehouse” at what is now Sagamore Hill National Historic Site. Xiomáro’s photographs show the house in a historically rare condition: the 23-room mansion, usually chock full of furnishings and mementos, was nearly vacant as part of a three-year, $7.2 million structural rehabilitation. The exhibit is unique in that Xiomáro’s photographs do not solely focus on TR, but also draw attention to his wife, children and servants to give a sense of what life was like in the household. It runs through December 31, 2014.

 

Judy Chicago: Through the Archives

Sep
1

This exhibition at the Schlesinger Library explores Judy Chicago, an artist, author, feminist, educator and intellectual whose career now spans five decades. Her influence both within and beyond the art community is attested to by her inclusion in hundreds of publications throughout the world. Chicago's teaching and use of women’s history and “women's crafts” revolve around her belief that “female experience could be construed to be every bit as central to the larger human condition as is the male.” The exhibition runs through September 30, 2014.

 

The Nature of Every Member: An Anatomy of Dissection at Harvard

Sep
1

This Countway Library exhibit chronicles the long and distinguished history of the study and teaching of human anatomy through dissection, moving from the very foundation of Harvard Medical School to the present day. Echoing the changes in teaching human dissection are the developments in anatomical legislation, as the illicit practice of grave-robbing for dissection gives way to Thomas Dwight’s 1896 formulation that cadavers for study are only “loaned to science,” paving the way for the legal instruments of anatomical gift in common use today. The exhibition runs through December 31, 2014.

 

From the Alps to the Ocean: Maps of the Western Front

Sep
1

World War One is often described as the first truly modern war, a war where advances in technology had outpaced the tactical thinking of the day. The massive changes that occurred in the field of military technology were mirrored in the field of mapmaking. New technologies led to new cartographic methods and techniques and to an increased reliance on maps. On the battlefield, cartographers were churning out maps of the trenches almost daily. At home, maps were being used to rally the home front in Europe and to try to convince the United States to join the Entente powers. Immediately after the war, maps were used to help decide how to redefine Europe. At the centennial of the start of the war, this exhibit explores the roles of maps and mapping on the battlefield and at home. The exhibition runs through November 11, 2014.

 

InsideOUT: Contemporary Bindings of Private Press Books

Sep
1

Fifty-nine binders and nine private presses from North America, Canada and Britain have collaborated to form an exhibition which demonstrates the relationship of the binding design to the printed book. Because many of the binders have chosen the same title to work on, it also highlights the differing approaches to the same text. Samples of the texts and illustrations are shown alongside the bindings. The relationship between private presses and bookbinders is longstanding and it is hoped that this extra element to the show will provide the viewer with a more rounded appreciation of the work on display. The curator is Lester Capon, Fellow of Designer Bookbinders, the organization that sponsored the exhibition for which these bindings were created. The exhibition runs from September 11 through December 13, 2014.

 

Romania's Abandoned Children: Deprivation, Brain Development and the Struggle for Recovery

Sep
16

The 1989 fall of Romania's Ceausescu regime left approximately 170,000 children in 700 overcrowded, impoverished institutions across Romania, and prompted the most comprehensive study to date on the effects of institutionalization on children's well-being. Romania's Abandoned Children documents the devastating toll paid by children who are deprived of responsive care, social interaction, stimulation and psychological comfort. Part of Countway Library's Notable Books Series.

 

The Power of Teacher Rounds: A Guide for Facilitators, Principals, and Department Chairs

Sep
16

With teacher rounds, educators share insights and grow professionally, benefiting from the peer learning common in other demanding fields. This invaluable book by Vivian Troen, former director of the Teacher Learning Project at Brandeis University, and Katherine Boles, director of the Learning and Teaching Master's Program at HGSE (with Jacob Pinnolis and Aviva Scheur), dives into the details of implementing a successful teacher rounds program.

 

Social Networks and Archival Context (SNAC): Building an Access and Description Cooperative

Sep
16

The Social Networks and Archival Context (SNAC) Project is working toward a sustainable cooperative for archival identity records using the Encoded Archival Context-Corporate Bodies, Persons, and Families (EAC-CPF) standard. Learn more about how the project team utilizes a user-centered methodology to test its access prototype and gather requirements for the upcoming maintenance portion of the system that will allow the community to contribute and refine the SNAC corpus. 

 

Citation and Reference Management Comparison Course (Workshop 2)

Sep
16

In this workshop we’ll compare the four major citation and reference management tools at Harvard.

 

500 Years of Human Dissection

Sep
16

Human dissection has been has been an integral part of medical training and the expanding of anatomical knowledge since 1543. For anatomists, obtaining human remains was difficult and isolating, often placing them outside societal norms and legal codes. This lecture by David S. Jones, A. Bernard Ackerman Professor of the Culture of Medicine and Center for the History of Medicine advisory board chair, and Dominic Hall, Curator, Warren Anatomical Museum, will illustrate how anatomists and physicians continued to acquire the teaching dead in face of these pressures and how this legal and ethical environment surrounding medical body sourcing has changed over the past 500 years. 

 

Harvard-Yenching Bibliographic Orientation: Chinese Resources

Sep
17

We are offering bibliographic orientation sessions to introduce you to the most important Harvard-Yenching Library resources in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean languages. These orientation sessions last about one hour. We look forward to seeing you there.

 

EndNote Workshop

Sep
17

Offered by the FAS Library Citation Tools Working Group.

 

Books@Baker: Michael Blanding, Author of The Map Thief

Sep
17

Author Michael Blanding will discuss his book, The Map Thief: The Gripping Story of an Esteemed Rare-Map Dealer Who Made Millions Stealing Priceless Maps. There will be a Q&A and book-signing. Light refreshments will be available.

 

Tour of Widener Library

Sep
18

Tours of Widener Library are offered every Thursday for all currently affiliated Harvard faculty, staff, students and visiting scholars. Conducted by research and reference librarians, the tour includes an introduction to Widener's collections, orientation to the facilities, including the reading rooms and the stacks and an explanation of services available to researchers. All tours begin just beyond the Security Desk at the main (Yard) entrance of the building.

 

Trends in ITS

Sep
18

Please join a discussion of trends in Information and Technical Services and how they might be adapted to benefit Harvard’s scholars. The format features a brief presentation to set the context for a broad, cross-library discussion of the benefits and challenges to meeting the growing needs of Harvard Library’s user communities, including changes to workflows in acquisitions and cataloging.

 

Harvard-Yenching Bibliographic Orientation: Korean Resources

Sep
18

We are offering bibliographic orientation sessions to introduce you to the most important Harvard-Yenching Library resources in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean languages. These orientation sessions last about one hour. We look forward to seeing you there.

 

RefWorks Workshop

Sep
18

Offered by the FAS Library Citation Tools Working Group.

 

RTL Shares: A Perspective on the New Media Consortium Annual Meeting

Sep
18

Presented by Kevin Guiney, Instructional Computing Specialist in ATG; Paul Worster, Multimedia Librarian in MMDGI; and Marty Schreiner, Head of MMDGI. The session will include their three biggest takeaways from the conference and their NMC Idea Lab presentation: A Teaching and Learning Model for Multimedia Authoring.

 

Colonial Governance and Medical Ethics in British India, 1870-1910

Sep
18

Kieran Fitzpatrick: DPhil candidate at the Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, University of Oxford, and Wellcome Trust Medical Humanities Studentship holder 2013-2016. The first in a series of four lectures given as the 2014 Colloquium on the History of Psychiatry and Medicine. 

 

Tour of Houghton Library

Sep
19

Public tours of Houghton Library are offered every Friday at 2 pm. Attendees receive a general introduction to the library, followed by a tour of the Emily Dickinson, Amy Lowell and John Keats rooms, as well as the suite devoted to the Donald & Mary Hyde Collection of Dr. Samuel Johnson. Those wishing to take the tour should meet in the Houghton Library lobby. Reservations are not required.

 

The Future of the Book: A Harvard Library Strategic Conversation

Sep
19

Book history continues to be a thriving area of scholarship, engaging librarians and academics from across the disciplines, including business, history, classics, art and design and, more recently, the digital humanities. Join us for a discussion with James O'Donnell, University Professor at Georgetown and author of Avatars of the Word, and Ellen Faran, director at MIT Press, that asks “What is the future of the book? How will recent developments in technology and publishing impact scholarship and publishing? Will—or should—the history of the book guide its future?

 

Mendeley Workshop

Sep
22

Offered by the FAS Library Citation Tools Working Group.

 

RefWorks Workshop

Sep
23

Offered by the FAS Library Citation Tools Working Group. 

 

Copy Cataloging DVDs Workshop

Sep
23
Image: Luca Colli (Creative Commons)

Do you copy catalog DVDs but find yourself increasingly confused by the changes and inconsistencies you see in bibliographic records cataloged according to RDA? We are offering a workshop to help the copy cataloger understand what is new in an RDA record and how changes are being implemented. The workshop will include a brief overview of copy cataloging DVDs and some hands-on practice in reviewing records. 

 

Zotero Workshop

Sep
24

Offered by the FAS Library Citation Tools Working Group. 

 

Trends in ITS

Sep
25

Please join a discussion of trends in Information and Technical Services and how they might be adapted to benefit Harvard’s scholars. The format features a brief presentation to set the context for a broad, cross-library discussion of the benefits and challenges to meeting the growing needs of Harvard Library’s user communities, including changes to workflows in acquisitions and cataloging.

 

Harvard Library All-Staff Meeting (Session 1)

Sep
26

Sarah Thomas, vice president for the Harvard Library and Roy E. Larsen Librarian for the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, will hold two all-staff meetings to update staff members on current and future library activities. There will be an opportunity for questions.

 

Harvard Library All-Staff Meeting (Session 2)

Sep
30

Sarah Thomas, vice president for the Harvard Library and Roy E. Larsen Librarian for the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, will hold two all-staff meetings to update staff members on current and future library activities. There will be an opportunity for questions.

 

The Evolution of the UK Research Reserve

Oct
1
Drummond Bone

Sir Drummond Bone and Deborah Shorley on ensuring continued access to low-use journals.

 

Film Screening: Real Women Have Curves

Oct
1

2002, directed by Patricia Cordoso, starring America Ferrera, Lupe Ontiveros, and George Lopez. Ana, a first-generation Latina, hopes to go to college, but her parents feel that working in her sister’s dress factory is a more fitting occupation. With the help of her teacher and her fellow workers, Ana struggles to balance her own ideas with her mother’s traditional view of women, while also dealing with self-image issues. Part of the Schlesinger Library Movie Night series. 

 

Advancing the Literacy Development of African American Boys

Oct
2

Join Alfred W. Tatum, dean, College of Education and director of the UIC Reading Clinic, University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Education, as he shares insights from more than a decade of research on advancing the reading, writing, and intellectual development of African American boys. He explores how local and national policies aim to improve US boys’ reading achievement but may actually impede it. Tatum will explain the value of examining socio-historical orientations and platforms to unbind the national narrative that has constrained the experiences of young African American males. A reception will follow.

 

Symposium on Sustainable Models for Print Storage in the 21st Century

Oct
2

The symposium brings together leaders in the reconceptualization of collection management from the US and UK, librarians and other stakeholders to advance thinking on optimal constructs for the coming decades.

 

RDA for Music: Classical Music Recordings Workshop

Oct
2

In this workshop, Damian Iseminger and Casey Mullin will teach the basics of cataloging classical music audio recordings using the current RDA standard. This workshop is designed for anyone who catalogs these materials and needs to learn how to do so in RDA.

 

How Journal Prices Impede Research Access: A Ted Talk

Oct
3

This discussion will feature Ted Bergstrom, professor of economics at UC Santa Barbara and a leading thinker around the economics of scholarly journals. He will be joined by Peter Suber, director of the Harvard Office for Scholarly Communication and the Harvard Open Access Project, and author of Open Access. Join a “fireside” chat between Bergstrom and Suber on the prices of scholarly journals, why prices have grown faster than inflation for decades, how they have limited access to research and prospects for change. Part of Harvard Library Strategic Conversations.

 

Open Meeting: Digital Futures Consortium

Oct
6

Regular general meetings for the Digital Futures Consortium will be held on the first Mondays in October, March and June. These are general meetings separate from any event planning or project working groups. They are open to anyone with interest in digital scholarship, its evolving tools, and tapping into potential working relationships.

 

RefWorks Workshop

Oct
8

Offered by the FAS Library Citation Tools Working Group. 

 

Harvard-Yenching Bibliographic Orientation: Japanese Resources

Oct
14

We are offering bibliographic orientation sessions to introduce you to the most important Harvard-Yenching Library resources in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean languages. These orientation sessions last about one hour. We look forward to seeing you there.

 

Harvard-Yenching Bibliographic Orientation: Chinese Resources

Oct
15

We are offering bibliographic orientation sessions to introduce you to the most important Harvard-Yenching Library resources in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean languages. These orientation sessions last about one hour. We look forward to seeing you there.

 

What They Wrote, What They Saved: The Personal Civil War

Oct
15

Diaries, letters, and firsthand accounts from four years of civil war offer intimate glimpses into the lives of men and women affected by the conflict. Tied up in ribbons, labeled in spidery hands, tucked into trunks, and saved by generations of kin, these 19th-century documents, photographs, artifacts, and books from the library’s collections speak of love, courage, ambition, humor, insecurities, and dreams. All this while they demonstrate the unexpected reservoirs of strength and the uncommon commitment of the men who fought in battles and women who aided the war effort—and of those at home who loved them. The exhibit runs from October 15, 2014 through March 20, 2015.

 

Exhibit Opening: What They Wrote, What They Saved: The Personal Civil War

Oct
15

An opening in honor of the Schlesinger's exhibit What They Wrote, What They Saved: The Personal Civil War. Remarks by Radcliffe Institute Dean Lizabeth Cohen and Harvard University President Drew Gilpin Faust.

 

Harvard-Yenching Bibliographic Orientation: Korean Resources

Oct
16

We are offering bibliographic orientation sessions to introduce you to the most important Harvard-Yenching Library resources in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean languages. These orientation sessions last about one hour. We look forward to seeing you there.

 

Who's Choosin' Who? Race, Gender, and the New American Politics

Oct
23

In 1985, Aretha Franklin released what became a widely popular single asking, “Who’s Zoomin’ Who?” It’s been nearly 30 years, but the question of just who is playing the fool is still a great one for American politics. Just short of the 2014 midterm elections we can ask, who’s choosin’ who? Why do midterm elections draw far fewer women and voters of color to the ballot box? What difference do changing demographics make in American elections? And how do voting restrictions passed by elected officials shape the electorate who then make the choice of whether or not they return to office? A lecture by Melissa Harris-Perry, Presidential Endowed Professor of Political Science at Wake Forest University. Introduction by Prof. Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

 

RefWorks Workshop

Oct
23

Offered by the FAS Library Citation Tools Working Group.

 

How Wonder Woman Got into Harvard

Oct
30

Wonder Woman is the most popular female comic-book superhero of all time. Aside from Superman and Batman, no other comic-book character has lasted as long. Like every other superhero, Wonder Woman has a secret identity. Unlike every other superhero, she also has a secret history. In this illustrated lecture, Lepore lifts that veil of secrecy to reveal that Wonder Woman’s past lies at Harvard and Radcliffe. A lecture by Jill Lepore, the David Woods Kemper ’41 Professor of American History at Harvard and a staff writer at The New Yorker.

 

Harvard-Yenching Bibliographic Orientation: Japanese Resources

Nov
18

We are offering bibliographic orientation sessions to introduce you to the most important Harvard-Yenching Library resources in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean languages. These orientation sessions last about one hour. We look forward to seeing you there.

 

Harvard-Yenching Bibliographic Orientation: Chinese Resources

Nov
19

We are offering bibliographic orientation sessions to introduce you to the most important Harvard-Yenching Library resources in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean languages. These orientation sessions last about one hour. We look forward to seeing you there.

 

Harvard-Yenching Bibliographic Orientation: Korean Resources

Nov
20

We are offering bibliographic orientation sessions to introduce you to the most important Harvard-Yenching Library resources in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean languages. These orientation sessions last about one hour. We look forward to seeing you there.