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Harvard University Archives
Records Management News: Donating Faculty Archives
 
 

Donating Faculty Archives

The Harvard University Archives collects personal and professional archives of Harvard faculty

Professor of Geology John Haller, HUGFP 84 (Digital image 2), Harvard University Archives
 
 

Retiring faculty members are encouraged to donate their archives

 

The personal and professional archives of Harvard's faculty are among the most frequently consulted materials at the Harvard University Archives by scholars and students from Harvard and around the world. The Harvard University Archives is Harvard’s principal repository for the archives of faculty and senior administrators, with collections that represent a significant resource for the study of the nation’s intellectual history. The Archives welcomes the donation of new personal and professional archival collections from Harvard faculty members.

The Archives, a unit of the Harvard Library, collects an array of personal and professional material from current and retired Harvard faculty across a wide range of disciplines. The faculty collections contain personal and professional correspondence, journals, diaries, and increasingly, e-mail; manuscripts; teaching materials; research notes; and data produced by more than 1,500 Harvard faculty members, covering four centuries of pioneering work and scholarly achievement.

Recently donated collections include the archives of Daniel Bell, Arthur Casagrande, David Donald, Paul Doty, Donald Fleming, Jennifer Hochschild, Jeremy Knowles, Norman Ramsey, Barbara Rosenkrantz and Stanley Tambiah. The faculty collections extend from the present back to the 17th century, and include such luminaries as Increase Mather, John and Hannah Winthrop, Josiah Royce, Annie Jump Cannon, B.F. Skinner, Eileen Southern and John Rawls.

Retiring faculty members are always welcome to contact Virginia Hunt, the Associate University Archivist for Collection Development, to schedule an individual consultation, discuss procedures for donation of papers, or for advice of any kind about records.  For more guidance on understanding faculty archives, please see Guidelines for Managing Faculty Files  and  FAQ.