Update:

We have resumed some on-campus services, including book pickup, virtual consultations, and fulfilling scanning/digitization requests. Many library materials are available online, but our buildings remain closed until further notice.

Join us to hear Heather Cole and David Gessner (Class of '83) discuss their recent books on Theodore Roosevelt, their use of the Roosevelt Collections at Houghton Library, and Roosevelt’s legacy in 2020. Cole, author of Theodore Roosevelt: A Descriptive Bibliography (Oak Knoll 2020) and Gessner, author of Leave It As It Is. A Journey Through Theodore Roosevelt's American Wilderness (Simon & Schuster 2020) will interview one another about their work, followed by a Q&A.

Registration required. The session will be recorded.

Heather Cole is the Head of Instruction at the Curator of Literary and Popular Culture Collections at Brown University's John Hay Library. Before coming to Brown, Heather was the Assistant Curator of Modern Books and Manuscripts at Houghton Library, where from 2012-2017 she was also the Curator of the Theodore Roosevelt Collection. 

David Gessner is the author of eleven books, including Leave It As It Is: A Journey Through Theodore Roosevelt’s American Wilderness and the bestselling All the Wild That Remains: Edward Abbey, Wallace Stegner and the American West. In 2003 Gessner was a Briggs-Copeland Lecturer at Harvard; he now serves as chair of the Creative Writing Department at the University of North Carolina Wilmington, where he is also founder and editor-in-chief of the literary magazine Ecotone. His prizes include the John Burroughs Award for Best Nature Essay, the Association for Study of Literature and the Environment’s award for best book of creative writing, and the Reed Award for Best Book on the Southern Environment. He lives in Wilmington, North Carolina, with his wife and daughter.

To request an accommodation or to ask a question about access, please contact us. Live closed captioning may require up to 3 days' advance notice.

Co-sponsor

    Harvard Review