Exhibit Overview

Sadada Jackson spent a year in residence deeply engaging and reflecting upon the North American indigenous language materials housed in Tozzer Library. She has created an exhibit that seeks to support speakers, students, and scholars of these languages in revitalizing, sustaining, and maintaining their languages by surfacing language materials in Tozzer's special collections.

Through the use of texts, maps, and media, this installation creates a visual and audible space for viewers to engage in bi-directional, internal and external dialogue about indigenous languages and the lands upon which they were/are spoken.

Sadada has richly overlaid this exhibit with her own personal narrative and the profound impact her grandmother had on her research process.

 

Read more here.

 

Dedication

To the generations of indigenous language speakers, students, scholars, educators, artists, activists, and humanists who came before us; to the generations of speakers, students, scholars, educators, artists, activists, and humanists to come; to all who are here and to all who are listening.

 

Exhibit Curator

Sadada Jackson

Harvard Divinity School Masters of Theological Studies, 2019

Tozzer Library Graduate Student Assistant, 2018-2019

 

Sadada's research at Harvard has focused on learning from the cosmologies, pedagogies, methodologies, and indigenous traditions and cultures of North America and Western Africa. She is passionate about cultivating the causes and conditions for deep, honest, responsible, and passionate engagement and inquiry of educational materials and structures, and learning relationships and experiences. Her hope is that this exhibit will invite the audience to deeply, honestly, responsibly, and passionately engage and inquire about the special collections materials at Tozzer Library. She is a member of the Natick Nipmuc tribe.

 

Questions

Contact: Susan Gilman, Librarian for Tozzer Library, sgilman@fas.harvard.edu