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Exhibitions & Events

Highlights of ongoing and upcoming events from across Harvard's libraries. Find more events by visiting the Harvard Library calendar, or submit a library event.

 
 

Opening New Worlds

An exhibition about Harvard's Colonial North American Project, open in Pusey Library through March 2016.

Opening New Worlds
 
 

Exhibitions

 

One Text, Sixteen Manuscripts: Magna Carta at the Harvard Law School Library

Through Mar
11
Magna Carta

First written in 1215, the ideas of liberty and human rights contained in and derived from England’s Magna Carta (the Great Charter) have persisted for 800 years. They have provided inspiration for developments in law now enshrined in constitutions and treaties across the world. The survival and resonance of those ideas is reflected in the manuscripts in this exhibit. The Harvard Law School Library owns close to 30 manuscript copies of Magna Carta; a few favorites are presented here. The exhibition is on view daily in the Caspersen Room through March 11, 2016. 

 

Embellishing the Map: Empty Spaces and Treacherous Waters

Through Mar
22

This exhibition is an exploration of the imaginative imagery that early cartographers used to populate the unknown areas of the world.  Including dragons, sea monsters and flying turtles. It is on view in Pusey Library's Map Gallery Hall through March 22, 2016.

 

Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616): Later Works and Legacy

Through Mar
24

It is a striking coincidence of literary history that the cornerstone figures of English and Spanish literature died within days of each other in the spring of 1616—William Shakespeare and Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra. We mark the 400th anniversary of Cervantes’ death with an exhibition of works from the last years of his life, as well as translations and adaptations that show the enduring legacy of his writing in the years following. The exhibition draws on Houghton’s outstanding collection of Cervantes’ works, formed principally by Carl T. Keller (AB 1894). In addition to first editions of Novelas exemplares, Persiles y Sigismunda, and Ocho comedias, the exhibition contains the first translations of Don Quixote into French, Dutch, Italian, and English. The exhibition is on display in Houghton Library's Amy Lowell Room through March 24. 

 

Opening New Worlds: The Colonial North American Project

Through Mar
31

The Opening New Worlds exhibition shines a spotlight on some of the remarkable material and work that is part of the multi-year Colonial North American Project at Harvard University. The materials in the exhibition are from the historical collections in the libraries and archives of Harvard Business School, Harvard Divinity School, Harvard Law School, Harvard University Archives, Houghton Library, and the Loeb Music Library. The exhibition is on view daily in Pusey Library through March 2016. 

 

Shakespeare: His Collected Works

Through Apr
23

Harvard has long honored the connection between Katherine Rogers, John Harvard’s mother, and William Shakespeare, both natives of Stratford-upon-Avon. As early as 1723, Shakespeare’s collected works were available to Harvard students in a single edition; since then, the college’s collection has grown to embrace the fullness of the dramatist’s literary and cultural legacy. To commemorate the quatercentenary of Shakespeare’s death, this exhibition presents over 80 rare and unique objects—many never before seen—drawn from the Harvard Theatre Collection and other library departments. The exhibition is open through April 23 in Houghton Library's Edison and Newman Room.

 

100 Years of Chinese Piano Music

Through Jun
4
100 Years of Chinese Piano Music

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the first publication of piano music in China. To commemorate the occasion, the Shanghai Conservatory Press produced a ten-volume anthology of piano works by Chinese composers which documents the evolution of expression from a relatively simple use of pianistic techniques to a gradual assimilation of Western musical styles. This exhibition traces that development by showcasing signature works and personalities along with milestone events in that eventful century of piano music in China. It is on display in the French Gallery of the Eda Kuhn Loeb Music Library through June 4. 

 

Corpus Delicti: The Doctor as the Detective

Through Dec
31

Although seemingly distinct disciplines, medicine and law—as medical jurisprudence, forensic medicine, or legal medicine—have been intertwined for centuries, and legal medicine itself encompasses a wide range of subjects, such as toxicology, psychiatry, chemistry, pathology, anatomy, autopsy, and suicide. Harvard Medical School’s involvement with legal medicine as both academic discipline and public service is the focus of a new display at the Countway Library. Corpus Delicti: The Doctor as the Detective is open through December, 2016 on the L2 level of the library.

 

 
 

Events

 

Harvard-Yenching Bibliographic Orientation: Japanese Resources

Tue
Feb
9
Harvard-Yenching Library

Harvard-Yenching Library is offering bibliographic orientation sessions to introduce students to the most important Harvard-Yenching resources in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean languages. These orientation sessions last about one hour.

 

Editing Shakespeare for the Digital Age

Tue
Feb
9

The 105th George Parker WInship Lecture, given by Stephen Greenblatt, John Cogan University Professor of the Humanities, Harvard University, with Misha Teramura and David Nee, doctoral candidates in the Department of English, Harvard University.

 

Harvard-Yenching Bibliographic Orientation: Chinese Resources

Wed
Feb
10
Harvard-Yenching Library

Harvard-Yenching Library is offering bibliographic orientation sessions to introduce students to the most important Harvard-Yenching resources in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean languages. These orientation sessions last about one hour.

 

Tour of Widener Library

Thu
Feb
11

Widener Library tours are offered every Thursday at 3 pm, except University holidays and Commencement. Tours are open to current Harvard affiliates. The tours provide an introduction to Widener Library’s collections, an orientation to the building and an explanation of services available to library patrons. All tours begin in the main lobby of Widener, and will last approximately one hour. No registration is required.

 

Harvard-Yenching Bibliographic Orientation: Korean Resources

Thu
Feb
11
Harvard-Yenching Library

Harvard-Yenching Library is offering bibliographic orientation sessions to introduce students to the most important Harvard-Yenching resources in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean languages. These orientation sessions last about one hour.

 

Sightlines, Part 3

Thu
Feb
11

The Digital Futures Consortium presents the third session in the Sightlines series—proJECT. This session will explore innovative, foreseeable, and imagined future uses for digital surrogates of cultural heritage materials—imagery, objects, and environments—and the impact of emerging and interactive technologies. With presentations, discussion, and hands-on interactive demos during the tech petting zoo, Sightlines has been designed to raise awareness and interest in enriching educational, artistic, and documentary content through investigative imagery.

 

Solo Chinese Piano Music—University Hall Recital Series

Thu
Feb
11

In conjunction with the exhibition One Hundred Years of Chinese Piano Music, on display in the French Gallery of the Eda Kuhn Loeb Music Library, Alex Beyer and George Li will perform solo Chinese piano music.

 

Tour of Houghton Library

Fri
Feb
12
Houghton Library

Public tours of Houghton Library are offered every Friday at 2 pm. Attendees receive a general introduction to the library, followed by a tour of the Emily Dickinson, Amy Lowell and John Keats rooms, as well as the suite devoted to the Donald & Mary Hyde Collection of Dr. Samuel Johnson. Those wishing to take the tour should meet in the Houghton Library lobby. Reservations are not required.

 

HLS Library Book Talk: Catherine J. Ross on Lessons in Censorship

Tue
Feb
16

The Harvard Law School Library staff invite you to attend a book talk and panel discussion in celebration of Harvard Graduate School of Education Visiting Scholar Catherine J. Ross’ recently published book, Lessons in Censorship: How Schools and Courts Subvert Students’ First Amendment Rights.

 

Alphabet Histories

Tue
Mar
29

Our knowledge of the origins, development, and potency of the alphabet depends upon various modes of knowledge transmission: textual, bibliographical, graphical, antiquarian, archaeological, paleographical, and digital. Each mode constitutes the object of study differently. The challenge in contemporary scholarship is to respect the cultural otherness of the past and the medium specificity of knowledge production and find ways of presenting synthetic but particularized analysis of evidence. Who knew what, when, and how about the alphabet—and how does that impact our current understanding of the now nearly global reach of a graphical notation system that arose among nomadic tribes in the ancient Middle East almost four millennia ago? The 106th George Parker Winship Lecture, given by Johanna Drucker, Martin and Bernard Breslauer Professor of Bibliographical Studies in the Department of Information Studies at UCLA.